23 Governors Push Trump to Better Regulate Auto Emission Standards

23 Governors Push Trump to Better Regulate Auto Emission Standards

23 governors join forces in hopes of urging Trump to change course on his plans for auto efficiency and emission requirements.

Gavin Newsom, Gov. California. Photo provided by Bloomberg.

Gavin Newsom, Gov. California. Photo provided by Bloomberg.

Momentum is growing with more than 20 state Governors joining forces to urge President Trump and his administration to implement automobile emissions rules on a national level that would require improvements to fuel efficiency each and every year. On Tuesday, 23 Governors issued a joint statement calling for a “common-sense approach” to this issue. They asked for a national approach to implementing regulation on emissions from automobiles with the goal of combating climate change. You may recall that back in 2018 the administration started to ease the existing rules and regulations on emissions.

Also worth noting is that some of the names on this statement were governors from key states in Trump’s victory in 2016. These states include Wisconsin, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. Contrary to California regulations, these states do not have aggressive pollution regulation in place for automobiles currently.

Part of the issue here is that Trump and his administration are proposing to remove California’s authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions from autos. While initially it would make sense to have a unified, national system, many governors feel that the current administrations proposal is too lax on requirements. The current proposal calls for a 37mpg fleet average by 2020 and that’s it. The governors on this list are calling for this requirement to continue to rise incrementally after 2020 as well.

Automakers have been chiming in on the issue as well, voicing concerns that disagreements between states and the federal government on this issue could lead to messy legal battles and a lack of clarity on what standards and measurements they are being held to. Besides the legal issues, disagreements here would lead to an overall inefficient system which could ultimately pass extra costs onto the consumer.

Stay connected with us:

foxxautomotive.com

YouTube (weekly featured stories)

Apple News